Stanislaus County officials break down COVID-19 numbers after 200th reported death – KCRA Sacramento

As Stanislaus County reported its 200th death from coronavirus, public health officials break down the cases and compare them to other leading causes of death.Bobby Moser, public health educator with the county’s Office of Emergency Services, said in a Facebook video release that COVID-19 has become the seventh leading cause of death in Stanislaus County, based on six months of data. Moser said coronavirus already accounts for over twice as many deaths as the flu does on an average year.”We can prevent COVID-19 from getting higher on the list,” Moser said as he went on to explain social distancing measures that can be taken to curb the spread of the virus.Below is a breakdown of the first 100 reported deaths in Stanislaus County, according to Moser:100th death was reported in July.Patients’ ages range from 29 to 97.81% of patients were 65 years or older.Most of them had underlying health conditions.3 in 4 deaths took place in a hospital.46% of patients identified as Hispanic or Latino.There are currently 200 people in the county hospitalized with coronavirus, Moser said; 63 of them are in intensive care.The county is operating at roughly 62% total hospital capacity, but there are only six ICU beds available, Moser said.There is still a backlog of reported cases because of an issue with California’s reporting system. At the time of the video release, the county had 198 deaths, but two more deaths have since been reported.

As Stanislaus County reported its 200th death from coronavirus, public health officials break down the cases and compare them to other leading causes of death.

Bobby Moser, public health educator with the county’s Office of Emergency Services, said in a Facebook video release that COVID-19 has become the seventh leading cause of death in Stanislaus County, based on six months of data. Moser said coronavirus already accounts for over twice as many deaths as the flu does on an average year.

“We can prevent COVID-19 from getting higher on the list,” Moser said as he went on to explain social distancing measures that can be taken to curb the spread of the virus.

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Below is a breakdown of the first 100 reported deaths in Stanislaus County, according to Moser:

  • 100th death was reported in July.
  • Patients’ ages range from 29 to 97.
  • 81% of patients were 65 years or older.
  • Most of them had underlying health conditions.
  • 3 in 4 deaths took place in a hospital.
  • 46% of patients identified as Hispanic or Latino.

There are currently 200 people in the county hospitalized with coronavirus, Moser said; 63 of them are in intensive care.

The county is operating at roughly 62% total hospital capacity, but there are only six ICU beds available, Moser said.

There is still a backlog of reported cases because of an issue with California’s reporting system. At the time of the video release, the county had 198 deaths, but two more deaths have since been reported.