453 new cases confirmed, no new deaths in Sundays COVID-19 report from DHS – WBAY

MADISON, Wis. (WBAY) – The Department of Health Services has received results of more than 4,800 coronavirus tests on Sunday.

Out of the 4,814 tests, 453 had a positive result, bringing the statewide total of positive tests since testing began on February 5 to 70,462.

The percentage of positive tests on Sunday is 9.4%, a decrease from Saturday’s percentage of 10.9%., continuing an upward trend looking over the past 14 days.

With no new deaths listed in Sunday’s report, the death toll remains at 1,081 in Wisconsin, which equals 1.5%, a percentage that has held steady since Friday. For a week and a half before that, it had held steady at 1.6%.

55 out of Wisconsin’s 72 counties reported an increase of cases, while Michigan’s Upper Peninsula saw an increase in six out of 15 counties.

For comparison, on July 21 deaths accounted for 1.95% of known cases, and on June 21 they were 3% of the cases.

Health officials say while a lot has been learned about treating COVID-19, the lower death percentage is mostly the result of the coronavirus spreading among younger people — children and adults in their 20s and 30s, who are more likely to be carriers of the virus than suffer the worst effects of it themselves.

The state reports 7,643 confirmed cases are active, which equals 10.8%, a decrease from Saturday’s report of 11.5%. Another 61,720 cases (87.6%), are considered recovered, an increase from Saturday’s 87%.

The state says 13 more people were hospitalized for COVID-19 since Saturday. There are currently 333 patients in hospitals, with 108 in intensive care. There are 171 suspected COVID-19 patients in hospitals waiting for test results.

The number of rooms available at hospitals and clinics remains at 22%, after having fallen to 21% on Friday. That still leaves 2,509 beds open.

[CLICK HERE to find a community testing site]

To help people understand how their decisions affect their own health and others, the Department of Health Services introduced a decision tool at https://www.dhs.wisconsin.gov/covid-19/decision.htm. Going beyond reiterating best practices like social distancing and wearing masks, the tool describes how choices matter and offers suggestions to make activities safer.

County case numbers (counties with new cases or deaths are in bold) are as reported by the DHS. County health department numbers may be different:

Wisconsin

  • Adams – 99 cases (+1) (2 deaths)
  • Ashland – 31 cases (+1) (1 death)
  • Barron – 358 cases (+5) (3 deaths)
  • Bayfield – 41 cases (1 death)
  • Brown – 4,959 cases (+53) (57 deaths)
  • Buffalo – 52 cases (+1) (2 deaths)
  • Burnett – 33 cases (1 death)
  • Calumet – 442 cases (+4) (2 deaths)
  • Chippewa – 301 cases (+8)
  • Clark – 228 cases (+4) (8 deaths)
  • Columbia – 319 case (+5) (2 deaths)
  • Crawford – 95 cases (+1)
  • Dane – 5,088 cases (+35) (39 deaths)
  • Dodge – 1,011 cases (+10) (5 deaths)
  • Door – 124 cases (+1) (3 deaths)
  • Douglas – 239 cases (+1)
  • Dunn – 154 cases (+1)
  • Eau Claire – 722 cases (+16) (6 deaths)
  • Florence – 19 cases (+1)
  • Fond du Lac – 942 cases (+37)
  • Forest – 64 cases (4 deaths)
  • Grant – 420 cases (+1) (16 deaths)
  • Green – 249 cases (+2) (1 death)
  • Green Lake – 76 cases (+2)
  • Iowa – 109 cases (+2)
  • Iron – 108 cases (+2) (1 death)
  • Jackson – 71 cases (+1) (1 death)
  • Jefferson – 819 cases (+7) (6 deaths)
  • Juneau – 171 cases (+2) (1 death)
  • Kenosha – 2,873 cases (+2) (61 deaths)
  • Kewaunee – 156 cases (2 deaths)
  • La Crosse – 1,038 cases (+8) (1 death)
  • Lafayette – 181 cases (+1)
  • Langlade – 76 cases (2 deaths)
  • Lincoln – 75 cases (+1) (1 death)
  • Manitowoc – 452 cases (+6) (1 death)
  • Marathon – 731 cases (+9) (13 deaths)
  • Marinette – 563 cases (+5) (6 deaths)
  • Marquette – 82 cases (1 death)
  • Menominee – 28 cases
  • Milwaukee – 23,209 (+65) (479 deaths)
  • Monroe – 266 cases (+1) (2 deaths)
  • Oconto – 358 cases (+5) (1 death)
  • Oneida – 192 cases (+1)
  • Outagamie – 1,550 cases (+13) (17 deaths)
  • Ozaukee – 853 cases (+13) (18 deaths)
  • Pepin – 46 cases
  • Pierce – 270 cases (+4) (4 deaths)
  • Polk – 156 cases (+3) (2 deaths)
  • Portage – 507 cases (+2)
  • Price – 33 cases
  • Racine – 3,840 cases (+14) (85 deaths)
  • Richland – 41 cases (4 deaths)
  • Rock – 1,560 (+6) (26 deaths)
  • Rusk – 23 cases (1 death)
  • Sauk – 588 cases (+19) (3 deaths)
  • Sawyer – 142 cases (+2)
  • Shawano – 231 cases (+2)
  • Sheboygan – 933 cases (+4) (8 deaths)
  • St. Croix – 590 cases (+16) (6 deaths)
  • Taylor – 83 cases (+2) (3 deaths)
  • Trempealeau – 395 cases (2 deaths)
  • Vernon – 86 cases
  • Vilas – 90 cases (+1)
  • Walworth – 1,591 cases (25 deaths)
  • Washburn – 55 cases
  • Washington – 1,458 cases (+17) (26 deaths)
  • Waukesha – 5,213 cases (70 deaths)
  • Waupaca – 592 cases (+12) (17 deaths)
  • Waushara – 133 cases (1 death)
  • Winnebago – 1,361 cases (+11) (20 deaths)
  • Wood – 417 cases (+4) (2 deaths)

Michigan’s Upper Peninsula

  • Alger – 16 cases
  • Baraga – 6 cases
  • Chippewa – 34 cases (+1)
  • Delta – 106 cases (+5) (3 deaths)
  • Dickinson – 60 cases (2 deaths)
  • Gogebic – 133 cases (+2) (1 death)
  • Houghton – 49 cases (+1)
  • Iron – 25 cases (1 death)
  • Keweenaw – 2 cases
  • Luce – 4 cases
  • Mackinac – 23 cases (+1)
  • Marquette – 199 cases (+4) (11 deaths)
  • Menominee – 194 cases (+7)
  • Ontonagon – 31 cases
  • Schoolcraft – 14 cases

Symptoms

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention identified these as possible symptoms of COVID-19:

  • Fever of 100.4 or higher
  • Cough
  • Shortness of breath
  • Chills
  • Repeated shaking with chills
  • Muscle pain
  • Headache
  • Sore throat
  • New loss of taste or smell

Symptoms that require immediate medical attention include:

  • Trouble breathing
  • Persistent pain or pressure in the chest
  • New confusion or inability to rouse
  • Bluish lips or face
  • The CDC says this is not an all-inclusive list. Consult a medical provider about any symptoms that are severe or concerning.

Prevention

  • The coronavirus is a new, or “novel,” virus. Nobody has a natural immunity to it. Children and teens seem to recover best from the virus. Older people and those with underlying health conditions (heart disease, diabetes, lung disease) are considered at high risk, according to the CDC. Precautions are also needed around people with developing or weakened immune systems.
  • To help prevent the spread of the virus:
  • Stay at least six feet away from other people
  • Avoid close contact with people who are or appear sick
  • Stay at home as much as possible
  • Cancel events and avoid groups, gatherings, play dates and nonessential appointments
  • Stay home when you are sick, except to get medical care
  • Wash your hands regularly for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol
  • Cover your mouth and nose with a mask. At a minimum, use a tissue when you cough or sneeze or use the inside of your elbow.

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