Health experts say more evidence showing vitamin D important to surviving COVID-19 – KMBC Kansas City

People get vitamin D naturally from sunlight and certain foods, but health experts say three-fourths of people don’t get enough, and when you are vitamin D deficient, you’re more susceptible to infections.Saint Luke’s Health System cardiologist Dr. James O’Keefe, who studied the effects of vitamin D for years, says it makes sense to watch your levels during the COVID-19 outbreak.“If you’re vitamin D deficient, you’re more likely to come down with COVID,” O’Keefe said. “If you’re vitamin D deficient, especially if you’re really deficient, you’re much more likely to have a severe case.”O’Keefe said he takes vitamin D supplements himself and recommends them to his patients. He also said it’s a good idea to get a blood test first to know exactly how much to take.“Most people need to take about 2000 units of vitamin D3 to keep their vitamin D levels in the normal range, so that’s a reasonable thing to do for people these days,” he said.O’Keefe said some people have a higher risk of not getting enough vitamin D, especially those with dark skin and adults over age 65.When it comes to COVID-19, there’s still a lot more research to be done. “In my opinion, there’s never been a more important time to keep your vitamin D3 levels normal, just because of this dangerous virus out there,” he said.Health experts said taking more vitamin D doesn’t take the place of masks or social distancing, but it could protect from a more severe case if you’re infected.O’Keefe also recommends getting outside more while the weather’s nice and get some of that natural vitamin D from the sun.

People get vitamin D naturally from sunlight and certain foods, but health experts say three-fourths of people don’t get enough, and when you are vitamin D deficient, you’re more susceptible to infections.

Saint Luke’s Health System cardiologist Dr. James O’Keefe, who studied the effects of vitamin D for years, says it makes sense to watch your levels during the COVID-19 outbreak.

“If you’re vitamin D deficient, you’re more likely to come down with COVID,” O’Keefe said. “If you’re vitamin D deficient, especially if you’re really deficient, you’re much more likely to have a severe case.”

O’Keefe said he takes vitamin D supplements himself and recommends them to his patients. He also said it’s a good idea to get a blood test first to know exactly how much to take.

“Most people need to take about 2000 units of vitamin D3 to keep their vitamin D levels in the normal range, so that’s a reasonable thing to do for people these days,” he said.

O’Keefe said some people have a higher risk of not getting enough vitamin D, especially those with dark skin and adults over age 65.

When it comes to COVID-19, there’s still a lot more research to be done.

“In my opinion, there’s never been a more important time to keep your vitamin D3 levels normal, just because of this dangerous virus out there,” he said.

Health experts said taking more vitamin D doesn’t take the place of masks or social distancing, but it could protect from a more severe case if you’re infected.

O’Keefe also recommends getting outside more while the weather’s nice and get some of that natural vitamin D from the sun.