Coronavirus in Oklahoma: Latest local updates, helpful resources – KOCO Oklahoma City

THIS MORNING. THIS IS A KOCO5 EDITORIAL WITH BRENT HENSLEY. THIS PAST WEEKEND. WE SAID GOODBYE TO SUMMER AND HELLO TO FALL WITH THE LABOR DAY HOLIDAY. IT’S BEEN A LONG HOT AND TRYING SUMMER WITH THE IMPACT OF COVID-19. NOW COLLEGE STUDENTS ARE RETURNING TO CAMPUS AND COLLEGE FOOTBALL IS ONLY DAYS AWAY. IT’S BEEN A TOUGH RUN AND WHILE IN MANY WAYS WE MAY BE DONE WITH COVID-19. COVID-19 IS NOT DONE WITH US. BUT WE’VE MADE GREAT STRIDES IN LEARNING HOW TO DEAL WITH COVID-19 MASK MANDATES AND CHANGING HABITS HAVE LED TO DECREASING CASE COUNTS. WE’RE GROWING ACCUSTOMED TO A NEW NORMAL. THAT IS HELPING US CONTROL THE VIRUS AND IN MANY WAYS OUR LIVES. OUR ECONOMY IS ON THE WAY BACK AND UNEMPLOYMENT RATES ARE IMPROVING. THERE ARE STILL CHALLENGES. BUT A LOT OF POSITIVES WE CAN POINT TO WE CAN’T LET OUR GUARD DOWN. IN FACT, WE NEED TO DOUBLE DOWN AND KEEP OUR MOMENTUM GOING SO WE CAN CHEER OUR FAVORITE FOOTBALL TEAMS THIS FALL SO WE CAN CELEBRATE THE HOLIDAYS WITH OUR FAMILIES SAFELY. AND SO THE END OF 2020 DOESN’T LOOK AS BLEAK AS THE START OF 2020 EARLY ON WE TALKED ABOUT BEING IN THIS TOGETHER AND WORKING TOGETHER TO WEATHER THE STORM. LET’S KEEP UP THE GOOD WORK. WEAR YOUR MASK WASH YOUR HANDS. AND KEEP WORKING TOGETHER. I’D LIKE TO HEAR FROM YOU EMAIL ME AT EDITORIALS AT KO CO.COM.

Coronavirus in Oklahoma: Latest local updates, helpful resources

KOCO 5 is providing you with the latest information on COVID-19, or the coronavirus, in Oklahoma, as well as resources to be prepared and keep your family safe. CONFIRMED COVID-19 CASES85,194 total cumulative cases; 1,007 deaths>> CORONAVIRUS MAP OF OKLAHOMA: Check cases by county>> CORONAVIRUS IN OKLAHOMA: Color-coded map of COVID-19 spread risk TOTAL NEGATIVE SPECIMENS:1,075,475 (As of Friday, Sept. 25) CURRENTLY HOSPITALIZED:579 (As of Friday, Sept. 25)RECOVERED:70,808 >> GET TESTED | Click here for a list of testing sites across OklahomaCORONAVIRUS CALL CENTERThe Oklahoma State Department of Health has partnered with 211Oklahoma to provide quick access to the COVID-19 hotline by dialing 2-1-1 from any phone.>> 15 Days to Slow the Spread: CLICK HERE to read the CDC guidelines on coronavirus>> GET COMPLETE CORONAVIRUS COVERAGE HERE LATEST LOCAL HEADLINES (As of Monday, Sept. 28) OHP captain dies after being hospitalized due to COVID-19, officials say Herd immunity possible without vaccine, but only with horrific death toll College-age students make up majority of state’s new COVID-19 cases, experts say Health officials worried people are letting down their guard amid pandemic as flu season nears School reopening, prison outbreaks and effect of Labor Day holiday likely contribute to recent COVID-19 spike TOTAL CUMULATIVE NUMBER OF CASES BY COUNTY (As of Monday, Sept. 28) Adair: 622 cases, 10 deaths Alfalfa: 72 cases Atoka: 303 cases, 1 death Beaver: 57 cases Beckham: 538 cases, 2 deaths Blaine: 131 cases, 1 death Bryan: 965 cases, 4 deaths Caddo: 779 cases, 21 deaths Canadian: 2,325 cases, 17 deaths Carter: 553 cases, 8 deaths Cherokee: 1,085 cases, 8 deaths Choctaw: 322 cases, 2 deaths Cimarron: 25 cases Cleveland: 6,063 cases, 70 deaths Coal: 70 cases Comanche: 1,610 cases, 13 deaths Cotton: 68 cases, 3 deaths Craig: 507 cases, 1 death Creek: 1,157 cases, 33 deaths Custer: 685 cases Delaware: 756 cases, 25 deaths Dewey: 67 cases, 1 death Ellis: 11 cases Garfield: 1,680 cases, 20 deaths Garvin: 372 cases, 5 deaths Grady: 1,083 cases, 11 deaths Grant: 48 cases Greer: 108 cases, 8 deaths Harmon: 44 cases Harper: 29 cases, 1 death Haskell: 279 cases, 4 deaths Hughes: 296 cases, 4 deaths Jackson: 775 cases, 10 deaths Jefferson: 42 cases Johnston: 173 cases, 4 deaths Kay: 596 cases, 13 deaths Kingfisher: 352 cases, 2 deaths Kiowa: 76 cases, 2 deaths Latimer: 137 cases, 2 deaths Le Flore: 1,136 cases, 18 deaths Lincoln: 452 cases, 10 deaths Logan: 492 cases, 1 death Love: 179 cases, 1 death Major: 91 cases, 1 death Marshall: 181 cases, 2 deaths Mayes: 641 cases, 11 deaths McClain: 874 cases, 7 deaths McCurtain: 1,285 cases, 34 deaths McIntosh: 324 cases, 5 deaths Murray: 139 cases, 1 death Muskogee: 1,832 cases, 23 deaths Noble: 152 cases, 2 deaths Nowata: 151 cases, 4 deaths Okfuskee: 140 cases, 4 deaths Oklahoma: 18,018 cases, 194 deaths Okmulgee: 835 cases, 7 deaths Osage: 985 cases, 13 deaths Other: 51 cases Ottawa: 871 cases, 6 deaths Pawnee: 255 cases, 3 deaths Payne: 2,254 cases, 6 deaths Pittsburg: 963 cases, 19 deaths Pontotoc: 427 cases, 3 deaths Pottawatomie: 1,364 cases, 10 deaths Pushmataha: 164 cases, 2 deaths Roger Mills: 452 cases, 1 death Rogers: 1,875 cases, 50 deaths Seminole: 453 cases, 6 deaths Sequoyah: 898 cases, 11 deaths Stephens: 444 cases, 5 deaths Texas: 1,520 cases, 9 deaths Tillman: 99 cases, 2 deaths Tulsa: 17,004 cases, 160 deaths Wagoner: 1,481 cases, 26 deaths Washington: 993 cases, 40 deaths Washita: 86 cases Woods: 113 cases Woodward: 1,059 cases, 4 deathsOKLAHOMA COVID-19 RESOURCESState officials put together a list of resources for Oklahomans to find services and information related to the COVID-19 virus. Oklahoma’s Health Response to COVID-19Center for Disease Control UpdateAid for Small Businesses for Actual or Projected Economic InjuryUnemployment AidSNAP, SoonerCare or Child Care assistanceChild Support AssistanceOklahoma Tax CommissionBirth or Death CertificatesVehicle Tag RenewalSHOULD YOU SEE A DOCTOR?Have you traveled outside the U.S. in the last two weeks? Have you been in close contact with someone testing positive for COVID-19? Do you have a fever greater than 100 degrees? Do you have respiratory issues?A fever alone is not an indication you need to be tested for COVID-19. But if you have traveled recently or come in contact with a COVID-19-positive person, you need to be tested.DO NOT GO TO A CLINIC OR EMERGENCY ROOM. Call your medical provider first and get instructions on how to report for a test.HOW DO YOU PREPARE YOURSELF AND YOUR FAMILYThe Centers for Disease Control and Prevention provides these tips to help you and your family avoid contracting COVID-19:Take everyday preventive actions to stay healthy.Avoid close contact with people who are sick.Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth.Stay home when you are sick.Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, then throw the tissue in the trash.Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces using a regular household cleaning spray or wipe.Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds.Prepare your familyPrepare your homePlan Ahead ChecklistStay informedProtect your healthPrevent Getting SickPreventing spreadProtect Others from Getting SickWhat to do if you are sickCaring for yourself at homeCaring for Someone Who is SickFREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONSThe Centers for Disease Control and Prevention provides these answers to common questions from the public:What are the symptoms?The following symptoms may appear 2-14 days after exposure: cough, shortness of breath or difficulty breathing, fever, chills, muscle pain, sore throat, new loss of taste or smellCan somebody spread the virus without being sick?People are thought to be most contagious when they are most symptomatic (the sickest). Some spread might be possible before people show symptoms; there have been reports of this occurring with this new coronavirus, but this is not thought to be the main way the virus spreads.Is it possible to get COVID-19 from touching objects?It may be possible that a person can get COVID-19 by touching a surface or object that has the virus on it and then touching their own mouth, nose, or possibly their eyes, but this is not thought to be the main way the virus spreads.Is it safe to go on a cruise?Cruises put large numbers of people, often from countries around the world, in frequent and close contact with each other. This can promote the spread of respiratory viruses, such as the virus that causes COVID-19. You may get sick from close contact with an infected person or by touching contaminated surfaces. CDC recommends that travelers, particularly those with underlying health issues, defer all cruise ship travel.What is the risk of getting COVID-19 on an airplane?Because of how air circulates and is filtered on airplanes, most viruses and other germs do not spread easily on airplanes. Although the risk of infection on an airplane is low, travelers should try to avoid contact with sick passengers and wash their hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds or use hand sanitizer that contains 60%–95% alcohol.HELPFUL RESOURCES:Centers for Disease Control and PreventionOklahoma State Department of Health COVID-19 responseOklahoma City-County Health DepartmentCleveland County Health DepartmentCanadian County Health DepartmentLogan County Health DepartmentTulsa Health DepartmentFull list of county health departments across OklahomaHow to clean your phone

KOCO 5 is providing you with the latest information on COVID-19, or the coronavirus, in Oklahoma, as well as resources to be prepared and keep your family safe.

CONFIRMED COVID-19 CASES

85,194 total cumulative cases; 1,007 deaths

>> CORONAVIRUS MAP OF OKLAHOMA: Check cases by county

>> CORONAVIRUS IN OKLAHOMA: Color-coded map of COVID-19 spread risk

TOTAL NEGATIVE SPECIMENS:

1,075,475 (As of Friday, Sept. 25)

CURRENTLY HOSPITALIZED:

579 (As of Friday, Sept. 25)

RECOVERED:

70,808

>> GET TESTED | Click here for a list of testing sites across Oklahoma

CORONAVIRUS CALL CENTER

The Oklahoma State Department of Health has partnered with 211Oklahoma to provide quick access to the COVID-19 hotline by dialing 2-1-1 from any phone.


>> 15 Days to Slow the Spread: CLICK HERE to read the CDC guidelines on coronavirus

>> GET COMPLETE CORONAVIRUS COVERAGE HERE

LATEST LOCAL HEADLINES (As of Monday, Sept. 28)


    TOTAL CUMULATIVE NUMBER OF CASES BY COUNTY (As of Monday, Sept. 28)

    • Adair: 622 cases, 10 deaths
    • Alfalfa: 72 cases
    • Atoka: 303 cases, 1 death
    • Beaver: 57 cases
    • Beckham: 538 cases, 2 deaths
    • Blaine: 131 cases, 1 death
    • Bryan: 965 cases, 4 deaths
    • Caddo: 779 cases, 21 deaths
    • Canadian: 2,325 cases, 17 deaths
    • Carter: 553 cases, 8 deaths
    • Cherokee: 1,085 cases, 8 deaths
    • Choctaw: 322 cases, 2 deaths
    • Cimarron: 25 cases
    • Cleveland: 6,063 cases, 70 deaths
    • Coal: 70 cases
    • Comanche: 1,610 cases, 13 deaths
    • Cotton: 68 cases, 3 deaths
    • Craig: 507 cases, 1 death
    • Creek: 1,157 cases, 33 deaths
    • Custer: 685 cases
    • Delaware: 756 cases, 25 deaths
    • Dewey: 67 cases, 1 death
    • Ellis: 11 cases
    • Garfield: 1,680 cases, 20 deaths
    • Garvin: 372 cases, 5 deaths
    • Grady: 1,083 cases, 11 deaths
    • Grant: 48 cases
    • Greer: 108 cases, 8 deaths
    • Harmon: 44 cases
    • Harper: 29 cases, 1 death
    • Haskell: 279 cases, 4 deaths
    • Hughes: 296 cases, 4 deaths
    • Jackson: 775 cases, 10 deaths
    • Jefferson: 42 cases
    • Johnston: 173 cases, 4 deaths
    • Kay: 596 cases, 13 deaths
    • Kingfisher: 352 cases, 2 deaths
    • Kiowa: 76 cases, 2 deaths
    • Latimer: 137 cases, 2 deaths
    • Le Flore: 1,136 cases, 18 deaths
    • Lincoln: 452 cases, 10 deaths
    • Logan: 492 cases, 1 death
    • Love: 179 cases, 1 death
    • Major: 91 cases, 1 death
    • Marshall: 181 cases, 2 deaths
    • Mayes: 641 cases, 11 deaths
    • McClain: 874 cases, 7 deaths
    • McCurtain: 1,285 cases, 34 deaths
    • McIntosh: 324 cases, 5 deaths
    • Murray: 139 cases, 1 death
    • Muskogee: 1,832 cases, 23 deaths
    • Noble: 152 cases, 2 deaths
    • Nowata: 151 cases, 4 deaths
    • Okfuskee: 140 cases, 4 deaths
    • Oklahoma: 18,018 cases, 194 deaths
    • Okmulgee: 835 cases, 7 deaths
    • Osage: 985 cases, 13 deaths
    • Other: 51 cases
    • Ottawa: 871 cases, 6 deaths
    • Pawnee: 255 cases, 3 deaths
    • Payne: 2,254 cases, 6 deaths
    • Pittsburg: 963 cases, 19 deaths
    • Pontotoc: 427 cases, 3 deaths
    • Pottawatomie: 1,364 cases, 10 deaths
    • Pushmataha: 164 cases, 2 deaths
    • Roger Mills: 452 cases, 1 death
    • Rogers: 1,875 cases, 50 deaths
    • Seminole: 453 cases, 6 deaths
    • Sequoyah: 898 cases, 11 deaths
    • Stephens: 444 cases, 5 deaths
    • Texas: 1,520 cases, 9 deaths
    • Tillman: 99 cases, 2 deaths
    • Tulsa: 17,004 cases, 160 deaths
    • Wagoner: 1,481 cases, 26 deaths
    • Washington: 993 cases, 40 deaths
    • Washita: 86 cases
    • Woods: 113 cases
    • Woodward: 1,059 cases, 4 deaths

OKLAHOMA COVID-19 RESOURCES

State officials put together a list of resources for Oklahomans to find services and information related to the COVID-19 virus.

Oklahoma’s Health Response to COVID-19

Center for Disease Control Update

Aid for Small Businesses for Actual or Projected Economic Injury

Unemployment Aid

SNAP, SoonerCare or Child Care assistance

Child Support Assistance

Oklahoma Tax Commission

Birth or Death Certificates

Vehicle Tag Renewal


SHOULD YOU SEE A DOCTOR?

  1. Have you traveled outside the U.S. in the last two weeks?
  2. Have you been in close contact with someone testing positive for COVID-19?
  3. Do you have a fever greater than 100 degrees?
  4. Do you have respiratory issues?

A fever alone is not an indication you need to be tested for COVID-19. But if you have traveled recently or come in contact with a COVID-19-positive person, you need to be tested.

DO NOT GO TO A CLINIC OR EMERGENCY ROOM. Call your medical provider first and get instructions on how to report for a test.

HOW DO YOU PREPARE YOURSELF AND YOUR FAMILY

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention provides these tips to help you and your family avoid contracting COVID-19:

  • Take everyday preventive actions to stay healthy.
  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth.
  • Stay home when you are sick.
  • Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, then throw the tissue in the trash.
  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces using a regular household cleaning spray or wipe.
  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds.

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Prepare your family
Prepare your home
Plan Ahead Checklist
Stay informed

Protect your health
Prevent Getting Sick
Preventing spread
Protect Others from Getting Sick

What to do if you are sick
Caring for yourself at home
Caring for Someone Who is Sick

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention provides these answers to common questions from the public:

What are the symptoms?
The following symptoms may appear 2-14 days after exposure: cough, shortness of breath or difficulty breathing, fever, chills, muscle pain, sore throat, new loss of taste or smell

Can somebody spread the virus without being sick?
People are thought to be most contagious when they are most symptomatic (the sickest). Some spread might be possible before people show symptoms; there have been reports of this occurring with this new coronavirus, but this is not thought to be the main way the virus spreads.

Is it possible to get COVID-19 from touching objects?
It may be possible that a person can get COVID-19 by touching a surface or object that has the virus on it and then touching their own mouth, nose, or possibly their eyes, but this is not thought to be the main way the virus spreads.

Is it safe to go on a cruise?
Cruises put large numbers of people, often from countries around the world, in frequent and close contact with each other. This can promote the spread of respiratory viruses, such as the virus that causes COVID-19. You may get sick from close contact with an infected person or by touching contaminated surfaces. CDC recommends that travelers, particularly those with underlying health issues, defer all cruise ship travel.

What is the risk of getting COVID-19 on an airplane?
Because of how air circulates and is filtered on airplanes, most viruses and other germs do not spread easily on airplanes. Although the risk of infection on an airplane is low, travelers should try to avoid contact with sick passengers and wash their hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds or use hand sanitizer that contains 60%–95% alcohol.

[mediaosvideo align=” embedId=” mediaId=’22fe9229-fb0e-4ea9-9010-bb6ea3f87f73′ size=”][/mediaosvideo]


HELPFUL RESOURCES:

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Oklahoma State Department of Health COVID-19 response

Oklahoma City-County Health Department

Cleveland County Health Department

Canadian County Health Department

Logan County Health Department

Tulsa Health Department

Full list of county health departments across Oklahoma

How to clean your phone